Category Archives: Design Book

From Hand to Hound?

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Jim Tolpin and I are pleased that our latest project “By Hound & Eye” is available for pre-sale through Lost Art Press. Some might ask, “How did the title of your earlier book “By Hand & Eye” morph into “By Hound & Eye”? Both books share a common source and are true to what you’ve come to expect from Lost Art Press.  They bubbled up out of our exploration into the design world of the pre-industrial artisan. Aside from diving into the historical literature, we took it one critical step further, trading in our tape measures and rulers in favor of dividers, and a straightedge. That may sound extreme or even limiting, but to the contrary we passionately believe it’s the most liberating (and fun) leap you can take to unshackle the imagination.  Jim has a saying each time we stumble onto some new (old) nugget, “Just the tip of the iceberg”. We are continually dazzled at the simple and profound insights unfolding before our eyes.

In short, our earlier book “By Hand & Eye” is the why behind the rich legacy of pre-industrial design, while this new workbook “By Hound & Eye” is the how. Pre-industrial builders shared a common design language that spanned cultures, time, and place. That language was what I call artisan geometry or practical geometry. Don’t let the word geometry scare you.  It’s not those mind numbing proofs and theorems from your school days. In fact, almost no math is involved besides the occasional two plus one.  Rather it’s a way of imagining and laying out space with dividers, a straightedge, and a ball of string. This simple language was used in antiquity to design and build great temples and cities as well as employed by our closer ancestors who used this language to skillfully to build a barn, a boat,  or a cupboard. Our first book “By Hand & Eye” will change how you think and look at furniture, while the skills imparted in the workbook  “By Hound and Eye” will transform how you work.

Lastly, why the Hound? We both felt this workbook should be fun, as opposed to what you might remember from the geometry of your school days. So we penned this as a light hearted journey seen through the eyes of a smart aleck dog named Snidely and a somewhat clueless and skeptical woodworker named Journeyman. We wanted to share the fun we’ve had on our journey along with making you a better woodworker.

George R. Walker

Workshop note: I’m teaching up at Lie-Nielsen Toolworks this upcoming weekend and there are still a few openings available. Join in the fun.

Hope you enjoy By Hound & Eye.

George R. Walker

 

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Shop Geometry that won’t make your eyes bleed

Roubo plate 23

Recently Chris Schwarz lamented that that much of the historic literature on craft is stuffed with geometry but doesn’t explain how to set up a smoothing plane. And to make matters worse the geometry lessons quickly spin out of control with drawings that look like some freakish nightmare.

Back in the day, books were expensive. A modest book in the 18th century could easily cost a weeks wages so a treatise on things like milking a cow or setting up a smoothing plane, or constructing window sash never entered anyone’s thought. In a village of a hundred souls, ninety-nine knew how to milk a cow and half of them could set up a plane in their sleep. Yet no one in the village, possibly no one in the county might know (let alone share), the knowledge that lies behind the smoothing plane, window sash, or that magnificent cathedral up on the hill. That my friends is geometry. But hear me out. It’s not as devilish as it sounds. This artisan geometry of the trades doesn’t involve memorizing a boatload of theorems and formulas that make you want to light up a cigarette and knock down a shot. Well you might want to do that for the pleasure of it, but not because the geometry drove you there.

I admit when I first explored what the old writers had to say, I complicated it by my own ignorance. I often passed over the simple stepping stones of knowledge and then skinned my shins. Here’s an interesting bit on this path of artisan geometry best illustrated by Plate one, figure one from Roubo’s monumental collection of engraved drawings.

Plate 1, figure 1 from Roubo

Plate 1, figure 1 from Roubo

 

Plate one, figure one starts with a point. Roubo isn’t alone in beginning at this humble starting place. Many similar examples could be cited, often there is a break in forty pages of medieval Spanish text with a single          .           followed by another twenty pages of narrative. Point being you can learn to visualize and build some really marvelous things if you begin at the right beginning. And that beginning is the humble point.

Jim Tolpin and I are at it again, writing a workbook that takes that historic knowledge and walks you through it step by step. Who knows? Maybe there’s some window sash, elegant chairs, or even a grand cathedral inside your head just waiting to be made if you knew what they knew.

 

George R. Walker

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Introducing Othie the shopdog

Jim Tolpin has an incredible woodshop and a shop dog named Othie.  Recently, Jim’s been working with Andrea Love to create a short animated clip of the work that the two of us have been exploring the past six years. Our book By Hand & Eye is the product of that journey into the world of traditional design. Take a look at Jim’s shop and his marvelous shop dog.

Enjoy.

 

George R. Walker

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Design workbook coming in 2015!

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Jim Tolpin and I are in high cotton. Even before By Hand & Eye was finished we sensed there was still a critical missing piece. That missing piece was a bridge that linked the head knowledge of design with the everyday practical problems in the woodshop.  Our thoughts kept turning to a down and dirty shop guide meant to hang on a nail over your bench. I’m happy to report we are at it hammer and tongs writing a design workbook slated for release next year through Lost Art Press . It’s a self study guide peppered with drawing exercises to hone your inner eye as well as a boatload of practical layout strategies like a quick and elegant way to space narrow slats on a chair back, or how to draw a sweet curve that bristles with just the right amount of energy.

“With the most primitive means the artist creates something which the most ingenious and efficient technology will never be able to make.”

Kasimir Malevich (Early 20th century Russian artist and theoretician) 

This workbook is a natural outgrowth of our own journey as woodworkers but also a product of the many workshops we’ve held over the last few years. Essentially it’s a guided tour back to first principles. We start from a single point          .↶   literally, and progress through lines, planes, solids, and curves. Along the way we explore proportions and patterns found throughout nature and the entire built world with plenty of exercises so you become familiar with the concepts. Armed with just a pair of dividers, a straightedge, and a ball of string, you’ll be able build your own version of the Parthenon, a pie cabinet, or some really snazzy patio furniture.


George R. Walker

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Compass layouts on Youtube

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Nearly every guide to the building arts going back to the dawn of printing included a series of geometric layouts with a compass. A challenge to the decipher, these lessons were shoehorned together, and made worse with a flurry of confusing text buried twenty pages away.  Our book “By Hand & Eye” was written in hopes of extending our building tradition by making it relevant to the modern artisan. To that end, we put together digital animations of those classic compass layouts. You can access them through this link to Jim Tolpin’s YouTube channel . For those of you that bought our book and had difficulty accessing the layouts, we hope this offers a solution.

George R. Walker

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Down the Rabbit Hole IV

In our newly released book “By Hand & Eye” we promised to post instructions build a sector. Jim put this together.

Making a Sector

Select clear, straight-grained, light-colored stock such as maple. Produce sticks from 4/4 stock, tapering from about 7/8-in. at the base to ⅝-in. at the far end. This taper isn’t necessary, but it looks nice and it brings the balance point closer to where you generally are handling it in use.  Your choice of length: I have one about 2-ft. long for scaling smaller projects and minor components and one about 3-ft. long for dealing with full furniture dimensions. The drawing shows the construction details and nuances—which include the fact that the pivot point of the sector’s legs is not the center of the hinge pin as you might expect, but the back of the hinge.

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Down the Rabbit hole II

Proportioning Systems Outside the Western World

(Your host of this particular rabbit hole is Jim)

One question George and I often get is whether this whole scheme of designing to whole number ratios is limited to the classical (i.e. pre-industrial)  “western” world. What about the vast, and just as ancient, built world of the Orient? That’s a big question, and probably the deepest rabbit hole we would ever want to jump into.

But what I do know from speaking with Dale Brotherton, a classically trained Japanese temple builder; and more recently gleaned from a book on Japanese joinery (“The Art of Japanese Joinery” by Kiyosi Seike), is that the sizing of Japanese joinery elements as well as the overall layout of structures were based on an idealized system of modular (i.e. whole-number) proportions called “Kiwari”. (A Japanese word which literally means: “wood dividing”). According to Seike, the first written evidence of this system has been traced back to the mid 6th century AD, while a five volume set of artisan’s manuals appeared in 1608.

Drawing:  A “four-and-a-half Tatami” room layout

By the 15th or 16th century AD, the module for sizing rooms became the tatami mat, which was a double-square rectangle about 3 ft. by 6 ft. (in our western imperial measurement system). Two of these mats–which together formed a square–were called a “ma”, and I believe served as the module for ceiling heights as well. Rooms were defined and sized by the number of tatami that could be contained in the room. In the drawing AT DIRECTION is a typical room layout for four and one-half tatamis. Other typical room sizes were six and eight tatamis. Essentially, they were growing the rooms in a Fibonacci series.

So what about now? It seems that the ancient artisan ways came to an abrupt end in 1868 with the downfall of the last shogun during the “Restoration of Monarchy” and the subsequent conscious and aggressive opening to industrialized western “modernization”.  (Sounds familiar, doesn’t it?)

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